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Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 (DTHX30/64GB)

5 Stars

Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0

Kingston Technology, a leader in system memory, has a wide selection of USB flash drives to choose from. On the high-end is the DataTraveler HyperX 3.0. A respected gaming and enthusiast brand, products that bare the HyperX name, usually have three things in common: extreme performance, superb build quality, and the signature blue color.

PROS

  • Extremely fast
  • Nice, durable casing
  • Great looking drive
  • Capacities up to 256 GB
  • 5 year warranty

CONS

  • None

DESIGN

Made of metal and rubber, the casing of the DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 feels very durable and well-made. It’s also larger than your typical USB flash drive, but not significantly larger than other USB 3.0 flash drives at similar capacities.

Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 angle

The DataTraveler HyperX 3.0′s cap can be removed and fitted to the back of the drive, to help prevent misplacing it. The back of the HyperX 3.0 also has a loop so you can hook it onto a keychain or a lanyard.

Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 cap off

At first glance, the drive’s activity light isn’t visible, but when active, you can see the blue activity light glowing from underneath the Kingston “Rex” logo.

Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 back

The bottom of the HyperX 3.0 has “Kingston” imprinted on it.

Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 bottom

PERFORMANCE

Using ATTO, I got max sequential transfer rates of 265 MB/s read and 152 MB/s write.

Kingston Data Traveler HyperX 3.0 ATTO benchmark

Using CrystalDiskMark, I observed transfer rates of 251 MB/s read and 153 MB/s write. These are SSD drive-like performance numbers and slightly higher than Kingston’s advertised speeds of 225 MB/s read and 135 MB/s write. They’re easily the fastest USB flash drives I have ever seen.

The 64 GB version came pre-formatted in FAT32 and had 59.6 GB of usable free space. I tested it in both Windows 7 and OS X 10.8, without any issues.

Kingston Data Traveler HyperX 3.0 usable free space

Because of its high-end performance and large available capacities (64, 128, and 256 GB), the DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 is an ideal solution for those who regularly transfer large media files or for extending storage on laptops with small internal drives, like the MacBook Air or other ultrabooks. The basic MacBook Air 13″ (mid-2012) model comes with only a 128 GB SSD drive that isn’t user-replaceable (at least, not easily). You could use a drive like the Kingston, as a storage device to keep downloads, photos, videos, and music, without taking up precious space on the internal drive. If the capacities are agreeable with your needs, there’s no need to use an external hard drive for storage.

As a side note, Kingston does not recommend formatting the drive with built-in OS formatting commands in Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux. For best results, Kingston recommends using their free formatting tool for Windows.

CONCLUSION

The Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 USB flash drive is blazingly fast. If top performance is what you’re after, it has you covered. It also comes in capacities up to 256GB. The casing of the drive looks great and feels very durable as well. If you need a USB flash drive just for transferring some small documents, this is not the drive for you. For enthusiasts who demand the very best and regularly transfer large files, the DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 will give you SSD-like performance in a tiny package. It comes at a high cost though. The 64 GB version costs about $100 and goes all the way up to over $500 for the 256 GB version. However, nobody complains about the price of a supercar; they know that they’re paying for the privilege of owning the best. And that’s what the Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 3.0 is –– the best.

Available from Amazon.com.

* Review sample provided by Kingston

Ed Rhee

Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, Ed is an IT veteran turned stay-at-home-dad of two girls. He reviews new gadgets at Techdad Review and his tech tutorials can be found online at Lifehacker, CNET, and eHow.


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